Extending the Ignitor from 16 Hours to Many Days

We caught up with Eduardo Abril de Fontcuberta, a Subject Matter Expert in survival topics, for some tips on using the 5.11 Ignitor pack. In the following article, Eduardo has tips for extending this one-day pack into two or three-day use.

I consider myself an advanced pack user and I say so with a smile on my face.

Why? Because I spend a lot of time with them on my back and equally a lot time experimenting and testing new stuff. Normally rucksack time is painful and sweaty, but not for me.

Due to the variety of my missions – as a sniper instructor, my training in survival and tactical skills and my hobby as a climber – I have found that no single pack does all I need. I use a couple of Eberlestock Phantom and Gunslinger packs as military sniper rifle carriers, a big North Face Summit 75lt climbing winter pack for high mountains and one small 5.11 All-Hazards Nitro pack as urban day carry-all. The problem started however, when I realised that for the rest of my outdoor activities, professional or amateur, I had too many packs.

All-weather weekends, long weekends in winter, week-long excursions and outdoor training, day alpine climbing, survival training… the list goes on. It was too complex and the different equipment locations and pouch configuration were driving me nuts.

So, consistent with the minimalistic and KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) attitude that I have developed as my physical strength fades with age, I set up some goals and requirements and started my KTPSS (Keep The Pack Simple Stupid) program.

 

USER REQUIREMENTS

I required a light pack — in weight not in ruggedness — between 35 and 45 litres, super configurable, able to carry my basic equipment and the mission specific stuff. The quality (materials, stitching and zippers) had to be on par with the premium packs that I already use. The color/pattern was important too – on many occasions I don’t want to be using MultiCam or military camo, as I want to remain low profile. I needed the pack in a subdued colour like tan, black, grey, forest green or similar.

When it comes to comfort, what really defines a pack is the surface area covered and the type of support designed into the back harness. How well it fits your back and waist and how you are able to adjust it. The trick, most of the times, is as simple as starting the process by adjusting the waist band first, so that it rests directly on your hipbones and the lumbar support rests directly on your hip, stopping it from sliding down. Then adjust the top shoulder pads with the top load adjusters slack and lastly, the chest band so the shoulder bands do not rub on your arms and biceps. I never adjust my top load adjusters until I am in motion because I don’t want them too tight, just enough so the top cargo is stable and close to my head. Any extra tightening will put pressure on my shoulders.

Any pack that I could adjust to my back like this would work for me and by following the above adjustment procedure, I can carry my standard min. load of 20 pounds (9kg) super comfortably (and my standard load of 30 pounds (14kg) nicely too!) on long treks and climbs.

 

THE IGNITOR

The first pack I selected was my Grievel Alpine-35/45 climbing pack. I had used it extensively for climbing in 2013-14 and while it was a little “big” for my purpose, it is a superb pack. It already looked a little battered, lacked MOLLE attachments and was red in color but even with these drawbacks, I used it for two separate, week long survival courses in 2015. It was not perfect, but I modified it (adding some pouches, like the two Nalgene water bottles I always carry on my waist) and made it work adequately well.

When I was considering a replacement for the next step in my KTPSS program, 5.11’s Ignitor pack came to my attention because it was very close to what I wanted, with many configuration options and priced right. With 26 litres on its full-length central compartment, it may just be large enough, if I reduced my load a little more and used external pouches. I could not resist buying one and started my tests.

The Ignitor pack has a distinctive military “fast” appearance, comes in tan or black and is not available in red. I will never share the “16 hours” concept for this pack. I could live from the land for 16 days with it.

It has MOLLE and lots of features; especially nice is having an admin pouch, as most packs don’t have a good one. The 300D ruggedised ripstop poly is a bonus and the bottom area 840D nylon is an insurance against failure under heavy use. These first impressions proved correct as after half a year of heavy use, no stitches have failed and no excessive fraying has been found. This is exceptional considering the overload and abuse.

I hate to take my pack off for normal actions, so here you can see the two 1,0 lt Nalgene inside H2O carriers on each side of the waist belt and out of the way. The right one has a hard case with a pair of Burner polarized lenses. Just in front I added a 6,5 pouch per side, the left with a medical kit and the right with my Garmin MAP64S and Brunton Truearc with scales for both EU 1:25K and 50K and US 1:24K, 62.5K and 63.36K. Adding to this a Kestrel Bluetooth anemometer, weather station and Applied Ballistic equipped computer. I found the IFAKs were too big, heavy and out of focus on most non-combat occasions, even though I still carry a NAR tourniquet and combat gauze.

I hate to take my pack off for normal actions, so here you can see the two 1,0 lt Nalgene inside H2O carriers on each side of the waist belt and out of the way. The right one has a hard case with a pair of Burner polarized lenses. Just in front I added a 6,5 pouch per side, the left with a medical kit and the right with my Garmin MAP64S and Brunton Truearc with scales for both EU 1:25K and 50K and US 1:24K, 62.5K and 63.36K. Adding to this a Kestrel Bluetooth anemometer, weather station and Applied Ballistic equipped computer. I found the IFAKs were too big, heavy and out of focus on most non-combat occasions, even though I still carry a NAR tourniquet and combat gauze.

The suspension system is called Zephyr and is nice in hot weather as it maintains the flow of air on the back. At first, I was worried of not having a height adjustable back and that the space between the load and my pack might be an issue. I was wrong as it has proven to be super comfortable and fits me, at 5,8 ft height, perfectly.

 

CONFIGURATION AND MODS

The Ignitor allows you to use the 5.11 RUSH Tier system to attach any MOLLE backpack to the outside, however the hangtag unfortunately does not explain this and I had to resort to YouTube for clarification. Even though I personally do not use that option a lot, for many users that own a MOAB bag or similar, smaller daypacks, it is a nice feature.

My COMM top pouch houses my Yaesu VX7R triband walkie, my solar USB charger and my Samsung G5 waterproof smartphone. On the outside pocket and quick to grab, I always carry my MC Tac Dry Rain shell, military issue ultralight outer shell and when I go hunting I can place my rifle muzzle down there too, on the rare occasion I let it out of my hands. Right next to it, the Ignitor admin pouch carries papers, pens, maps and other small items. The outside 10,5 vertical pouch is used for those things you might need without having to unpack, like fire kits, a few powerbars, my alum jar, Snow Peak titanium spork, Leatherman Signal, some 550 paracord, Petzl Tactikka headlamp, gloves, batteries and other small items. It is still not full which adds versatility if I need a pair of socks or a hoodie. On the outside I have various elastic bungees to aid attaching any veggies I can collect for dinner.

My COMM top pouch houses my Yaesu VX7R triband walkie, my solar USB charger and my Samsung G5 waterproof smartphone. On the outside pocket and quick to grab, I always carry my MC Tac Dry Rain shell, military issue ultralight outer shell and when I go hunting I can place my rifle muzzle down there too, on the rare occasion I let it out of my hands.
Right next to it, the Ignitor admin pouch carries papers, pens, maps and other small items. The outside 10,5 vertical pouch is used for those things you might need without having to unpack, like fire kits, a few powerbars, my alum jar, Snow Peak titanium spork, Leatherman Signal, some 550 paracord, Petzl Tactikka headlamp, gloves, batteries and other small items. It is still not full which adds versatility if I need a pair of socks or a hoodie. On the outside I have various elastic bungees to aid attaching any veggies I can collect for dinner.

The same goes for the hydration pouch, which I don’t normally use. I have used hydration bags for more than 20 years and had many issues with them, so finally went back to Nalgene bottles for my survival water reserves. In some conditions I can profit from the convenience of the tube supply but with these tough bottles, I am sure that my water will be there when I need it. And talking about the water bottles:

I had to tighten the Ignitor waist-band pockets hard against the pack body to make the side pockets stable with the heavy load of the 1,0lt bottles and H2O carrier pouch. After this adjustment, I have found that they are in a perfect position, out of the way, accessible with one hand and safe. Now I can raise the pack without the band twisting on itself under the load, a condition that has made fastening the clasp a tricky maneuver.

The Ignitor had no provision for attaching a karabiner equipped safety line in a hard point (to secure pack in non-stable conditions), attachment points for ice axes or semi-rigid daisy chain in waist for karabiners or hanging heavy equipment. However, I equipped it in no time using the MOLLE web and some imagination.

My Black Diamond trekking sticks have saved my knees many times and the side pockets house some 8,5 mm static line, a safety carabiner and two 3,0 meter Dyneema 25KN slings which can be converted to rappel harnesses or anchors.

My Black Diamond trekking sticks have saved my knees many times and the side pockets house some 8,5 mm static line, a safety carabiner and two 3,0 meter Dyneema 25KN slings which can be converted to rappel harnesses or anchors.

LAST COMMENTS

I am still working with the different external pouch positions to make it easier to configure for different applications, be it snow, alpine climbing or one-week survival courses, but I am getting there. One thing I want to upgrade is my Medical Kit design, which is still not finalised. I plan to try the 5.11 UCR IFAK pouch, as my contents do not fit the smaller, typical MedKit pouches.

There are only two small suggestions for improvement: one is the addition of a waterproof cover and a proper place to stow such a cover. The lack of the cover reduces the packs flexibility as it limits bad weather use, especially heavy rain.

Secondly, I have found that the bottom straps are too short to attach my Thermarest mattress to.

I substituted the short bottom straps with a pair of HD bungees that keep my Thermarest safe and can double as Basha tensioners at night or under the Sun.

I substituted the short bottom straps with a pair of HD bungees that keep my Thermarest safe and can double as Basha tensioners at night or under the Sun.

The Ignitor is a superb pack for military DA operations, limited survival in the field and as a general 3-5 day pack. It is very well made and rugged. The features are convenient and most users will not find problems adapting their pouches to it. Flexible enough due to its MOLLE, that if you have the skills it can become a two-week pack too.

At first I though I could not fit all my stuff inside the Ignitor but it is bigger than it looks, so much so that I can carry my Jetboil, my cooking pots with soap, salt, olive oil, flour, sugar, spices, coffee and bleach for potabilising inside. As my shelter, I use a 500gr down, sleeping bag, a USMC bivvy and an Altus military basha with pre-cut paracord lines. Add a set of underwear, pants and some anti-mosquito spray.

At first I though I could not fit all my stuff inside the Ignitor but it is bigger than it looks, so much so that I can carry my Jetboil, my cooking pots with soap, salt, olive oil, flour, sugar, spices, coffee and bleach for potabilising inside. As my shelter, I use a 500gr down, sleeping bag, a USMC bivvy and an Altus military basha with pre-cut paracord lines. Add a set of underwear, pants and some anti-mosquito spray.

 


Eduardo Abril de Fontcuberta is one of the world´s most respected sniper instructors with over 20 years of experience as MIL/LEO sniper instructor and various sniping books and a multitude of articles published. Also a survival expert, military high speed boat captain and high speed navigation instructor for SPECTRE, and consultant for some of the top military equipment corporations. Eduardo helps our 5.11 design teams with his independent tests, R&D, T&E and articles

Categorized in Gear, XPRT Series Posted April 04, 2016